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DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY COURSE OFFERINGS

Spring 2022

 

HSTY 113. Introduction to Modern World History. 3 Units.

The history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in global context. Emphasis on the forces that have created or shaped the modern world: industrialization and technological change; political ideas and movements such as nationalism; European imperialism and decolonization; and the interplay of cultural values. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

HSTY 126. Fashion and Power: The Politics of Dress in American History. 3 Units.

Clothing is one of the most visible and accessible means through which we express our identities.This seminar will examine the links between clothing, sartorial practices and political significance. Special attention will be given to the role of clothes in negotiating and constructing gender, race, class, sexual, and national identities. Readings will address the question of sartorial politics from a historical perspective and will focus on American history and culture from the 18th century to the present. Students may not earn credit for both this course and USSO 290U. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 132. Introduction to Modern East Asia. 3 Units.

HSTY 132 is an introduction to the histories of modern China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam from the “dawn of the global world” in the 17th century to present. Taken together these regions make up the geographic and cultural unit commonly referred to as “East Asia.” As we move through the course material our goal is not to gain total knowledge of modern East Asia, nor of China, Japan, Korea nor Vietnam. Rather, by the end of the term you should be able to identify some of the main organizing themes in modern East Asian history and develop a greater understanding of the construction and nature of historical knowledge itself. Offered as HSTY 132 and ASIA 132. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 152. Technology in America. 3 Units.

Origins and significance of technological developments in American history, from the first settlements to the present. Emphasis on the social, cultural, political, and economic significance of technology in American history.

 

HSTY 157. Women’s Histories in South Asia. 3 Units.

This course traces the history of women in South Asia from pre-colonial times to the present. Themes explored in the course will include (but not be limited to): the historical transformations of institutions shaping women’s lives such as state, family, religious and legal traditions; the impact of colonialism, nationalism, and decolonization on women, as well as the history of women’s movements in various parts of South Asia. Offered as HSTY 157 and WGST 257. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 216. Vikings and Medieval Scandinavia. 3 Units.

A survey of the history of the Vikings and medieval Scandinavia, covering approximately the eighth to the fifteenth centuries AD. Topics explored include: causes of the “outbreak” and cessation of Viking expeditions, the role of the Vikings as raiders and/or traders in Western Europe, the role of the Vikings in the emerging states of Russia, Iceland and medieval Scandinavian law, the historicity of the saga literature, and Viking descendents–Normans and “Rus.” Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 236. World War I: Crucible of the 20th Century. 3 Units.

World War I changed everything about Europe and ushered in a changed century of tumult, war, and division. The European experience of the regimentation of the economy and daily life, the impact of new technology on warfare, and the very personal suffering of separation and loss changed how those on that continent viewed their countries and their world. The war affected everything from gender relations to class relations to religious and ethnic relations and laid the foundation for even more disruption ahead. Its legacy reaches our day and colors our own views of what is normal and what is possible. This course will explore those multiple and manifold legacies of this founding experience of modernity. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 239. Freud and the Psychoanalytic Movement. 3 Units.

This is a course in the social history of ideas, which will examine the roots and development of psychoanalysis, and consider several major post-Freudian innovators. It will conclude with interpretations of the social context and social effects of psychoanalysis. Offered as HSTY 239 and HSTY 439.

 

HSTY 247. American Capitalism Since 1945. 3 Units. JANUARY SESSION

This course explores the history of capitalism since the end of World War II when the United State emerged as a superpower and capitalist system expanded across the globe. It will explore the postwar economic boom, the crisis of the 1970s, and the rise of a neoliberalism by using the historical method. It will help students understand the world in which they live which is characterized by precarious employment, homelessness, and radical extremes in income and wealth.

 

HSTY 248. Digital History Internship with the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History. 3 Units.

This directed digital history internship focuses on familiarizing students with the evolving nature of on-line, vetted historical resources, most particularly encyclopedias and other multi-authored datasets, and providing experience in expanding and maintaining a major web-based historical resource. Students will work with the editor (the instructor for the course) and the graduate student associate editors of the on-line edition of the Encyclopedia of Cleveland History (https://case.edu/ech/) in creating new content for the on-line edition of the Encyclopedia and in modifying and enhancing its website, as well as assisting with the management of its social media components.

 

HSTY 259. Introduction to Latina/o Studies. 3 Units.

Interdisciplinary introduction to the basis for a Latina/o ethnicity through an exploration of commonalities and differences in the peoples of Latin American and Caribbean origin within the continental United States. Topics include methodological and theoretical formulations central to the field (e.g., racial, gender, and sexual formations, modes and relations of production and class, nation and transnation), history and contemporary issues of identity, family, community, immigration, and the potential for a pan-ethnic identity. Offered as: ETHS 252B and HSTY 259. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 272. Sports in America: From Play to Profit. 3 Units.

This course reviews the history of sports in America from the colonial period to the present. It gives particular attention to the evolution of sports as a major business and to the roles of gender, ethnicity, and race in the history of America sport, as well as to the emergence of sport as a major defining characteristic of America life and society. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 274. Race and Medicine. 3 Units.

Race, racism, and medicine have long been intertwined. Medicine has had a major role in the formation of the concept of race, and racism has had important roles in the development of modern medicine, and in the production of health inequalities. This course looks at these relationships from a historical point of view. Designed to be a part of the minor in African and African-American studies, it emphasizes African and African American history, though there will be opportunities for students who wish to explore other aspects of race, ethnicity, medicine. Topics will include the medical construction of race, African medical systems, medicine and slavery, human experimentation, health and segregation, anti-racist medicine, and continuing problems of health inequality.

 

HSTY 278. Nineteenth-Century Europe. 3 Units.

This course examines the history of Europe during the so-called long nineteenth century, lasting from the French Revolution, which signaled the end of the Old Order, through World War I, which led to the end of the European primacy in the world. Major themes include decline of aristocratic hegemony, the emergence of new ideologies (especially nationalism, liberalism, and socialism), the rise of the bourgeoisie, culture in Europe’s golden age, and increasing national rivalry and competition. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 310. The French Revolutionary Era. 3 Units.

Causes, progress, and results of the internal transformation of France from 1789 to 1815; impact of revolutionary ideas on other European and non-European societies.

 

 

HSTY 315. Heresy and Dissidence in the Middle Ages. 3 Units.

Survey of heretical individuals and groups in Western Europe from 500 – 1500 A.D., focusing on popular rather than academic heresies. The development of intolerance in medieval society and the problems of doing history from hostile sources will also be explored. Offered as HSTY 315 and RLGN 315. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

 

HSTY 323. Fascism in America. 3 Units.

In recent years, there is a growing public discussion about the rise of fascist trends and movements in America. This course will explore the historic roots of this discussion, focusing on the period between the late nineteenth century and McCarthyism in the early 1950s. Using both primary and secondary sources, we will examine in class the origins and manifestations of fascist ideas in the American context, looking at topics such as government repression, racism, nativism, the rise of the surveillance state, red scares, and immigration persecution. Students will engage in thinking of the long history of undemocratic forces in America and their place in American culture, as well as how their legacies shape our political landscape today. Offered as HSTY 323 and HSTY 423.

 

HSTY 371. Jews Under Islam and Christianity. 3 Units.

This course examines the social and political status of Jews under Muslim and Christian rule since the Middle Ages. Themes include interfaith relations, Islamic and Christian beliefs regarding the Jews, Muslim and Christian regulation of Jewry, and the Jewish response. Offered as HSTY 371JDST 371 and RLGN 371. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 372. Africa’s International Relations: 1945 to the Present

This course examines the development of Africa’s international relations from World War II to the present. Students will become familiar with some of the major issues that have faced African international relations in the past, present, and are likely to in the future. This course will explore the complex, contradictory, and rapidly changing political, economic, social, cultural, strategic, and geopolitical forces that shaped these relations separately and in their interconnections. Offered as POSC372AFST372

 

HSTY 378. North American Environmental History. 3 Units.

This course introduces major questions and approaches in the study of environmental history. Taking North American as our subject, we explore how humans have shaped the environment of the continent and how human history has, in turn been shaped by the natural world form antiquity to the present. Major topics include Pleistocene extinctions, the Columbian exchange, the market revolution in agriculture, American epidemics, industrialization, the origins of conservation, the environmental movement, and the globalization of America’s environmental footprint. Offered as HSTY 378 and HSTY 468.

 

HSTY 387. Growing Up in America: 1607 – 2000. 3 Units.

Children have been growing up in the United States since it was declared independent, in 1776, but how adults conceive of (and therefore legislate and interpret) children and childhood constantly changes to fit current circumstances. The experiences of children themselves have varied not only in terms of race, class, gender, and religion but also depending on specific events (i.e., coming of age during the Civil War versus the Civil Rights movement) or geography (i.e., growing up in rural Hawaii vs. urban New Jersey). Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 393. Advanced Readings in the History of Race. 3 Units.

This course examines the concept of race as a social construction that carries political and economic implications. We begin by examining the histories of the early racial taxonomists (e.g., Bernier, Linnaeus, and Blumenbach among others) and the contexts that informed their writings. We then assess how the concept of race changed from the nineteenth to the twentieth century in the United States. We conclude by evaluating how the ideology of race has influenced U.S. domestic life and foreign policy at specific historical moments. Offered as AFST 393HSTY 393HSTY 493, and ETHS 393. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 411. Seminar: Modern American Historiography. 3 Units.

This seminar examines the approaches that professional historians of the United States have taken to the writing of American history in the past fifty years, with emphasis on changes in historical concerns, master debates among historians, and contemporary interests. Topics covered include national politics and government, economic development, social history, the history of ethnicity, race, and gender, and foreign policy and international relations. Each student will read widely and will prepare a series of reports on selected books and authors. Offered as HSTY 311 and HSTY 411. Prereq: Graduate standing or instructor permission.

 

 

HSTY 423. Fascism in America. 3 Units.

In recent years, there is a growing public discussion about the rise of fascist trends and movements in America. This course will explore the historic roots of this discussion, focusing on the period between the late nineteenth century and McCarthyism in the early 1950s. Using both primary and secondary sources, we will examine in class the origins and manifestations of fascist ideas in the American context, looking at topics such as government repression, racism, nativism, the rise of the surveillance state, red scares, and immigration persecution. Students will engage in thinking of the long history of undemocratic forces in America and their place in American culture, as well as how their legacies shape our political landscape today. Offered as HSTY 323 and HSTY 423.

 

HSTY 439. Freud and the Psychoanalytic Movement. 3 Units.

This is a course in the social history of ideas, which will examine the roots and development of psychoanalysis, and consider several major post-Freudian innovators. It will conclude with interpretations of the social context and social effects of psychoanalysis. Offered as HSTY 239 and HSTY 439.

 

HSTY 468. North American Environmental History. 3 Units.

This course introduces major questions and approaches in the study of environmental history. Taking North American as our subject, we explore how humans have shaped the environment of the continent and how human history has, in turn been shaped by the natural world from antiquity to the present. Offered as HSTY 378 and HSTY 468. Prereq: Graduate standing or instructor permission

 

HSTY 474. Race and Medicine. 3 Units.

Race, racism, and medicine have long been intertwined. Medicine has had a major role in the formation of the concept of race, and racism has had important roles in the development of modern medicine, and in the production of health inequalities. This course looks at the history of these relationships. Designed for graduate students interested in African and African American Studies. It emphasizes African and African American history, though there will be opportunities for students who wish to explore other aspects of race, ethnicity, medicine. Topics will include the medical construction of race, African medical systems, medicine and slavery, human experimentation, health and segregation, anti-racist medicine, and continuing problems of health inequality.

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HSTY 479. Historical Research and Writing. 3 Units.

Research seminar for graduate students. Intensive focus on processes of historical research and writing. Students produce a conference paper and a research paper based on primary sources on a topic of their own choosing. Prereq: Graduate standing or instructor permission.