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DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY COURSE OFFERINGS

Fall 2022

HSTY 100 Introduction to History. 1 Units.

HSTY 100 introduces students to the various theories and methods that underlie historical scholarship, and to the value of historical analysis to disciplines, careers, and professions that American popular culture depicts, wrongly, as being distant from historical understanding. Students who successfully complete HSTY 100 will receive recognition of one three-credit course for a 5 on an AP History exam or a 6 or 7 on an IB Higher Level History exam. Prereq: Score of 5 on AP History Exam or Score of 6 or 7 on IB Higher Level History Exam

HSTY 103 Introduction to Medieval History. 3 Units.

Medieval history and civilization from the fall of the Roman Empire to the age of the Renaissance. Interactions between medieval Europe and other Mediterranean and Eurasian cultures. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement

HSTY 108 Introduction to Early American History 3 Units.

This course offers an introduction to American history through a thematic survey of colonial British North America and the early United States, from the first permanent English settlements of the early seventeenth century to the onset of the American Civil War. It focuses on (1) the emergence and development of contrasting social systems in the various colonies; (2) the causes and consequences of the American Revolution; and (3) the political, religious, and economic transformations of the period 1790 through 1860.  Particular attention will be paid to the experiences of women and African Americans. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

HSTY 113 Intro to Modern World History. 3 Units.

The history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in global context. Emphasis on the forces that have created or shaped the modern world: industrialization and technological change; political ideas and movements such as nationalism; European imperialism and decolonization; and the interplay of cultural values. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 137 Introduction to Modern South Asia. 3 Units.

This course will introduce students to the history of the region that today includes India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. The course will deal with the following themes: global trade between the Indian subcontinent and the West in the 17th century; the rise of the East India Company’s dominance over the Indian subcontinent in the 18th century; the transformation of India into a colonial economy; social and religious reform movements of the 19th century; changing modalities of colonial rule after the transfer of governing power from the East India Company to the British Crown-in-Parliament; the emergence and trajectories of elite and popular anti-colonial nationalisms; the struggles of women, low status groups, and other minorities in the region; decolonization; and the partition of the subcontinent. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 138 Radical History 3 Units.

This course examines the radical tradition in America from the time of the American Revolution until the present. Topics will include abolitionism, suffrage, anarchism, socialism, communism, black power, feminism, the New Left, radical environmentalism, and queer liberation. Recommended Preparation: High school American history. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

HSTY 201 Science in Western Thought I. 3 Units.

The development of Western thinking about the natural world and our relation to it, as part of culture, from pre-classical civilizations to the age of Newton.

HSTY 206 Ancient and Medieval Spain: Prehistory to 1492. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the history of the Iberian peninsula from before the Roman conquest from the Iberians, Greek, and Carthaginian settlements, through Roman, Visigothic, and Muslim rule to the conquest of Ferdinand and Isabella of the last non-Christian territory on the peninsula in 1492. The issues of conquest, frontier, cultural diversity, and change, tolerance, and intolerance will be examined. Offered as CLSC 206 and HSTY 206. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

HSTY 212. U.S. Politics, Culture, and Society, 1790-1860. 3 Units.

This is a survey of U.S. history during the years between the Revolutionary era and the Civil War, exploring the transformation of American politics, religion, and culture, as well as the emergence of distinctive regional economies and social systems in the South, the Midwest, and the Northeast. It focuses especially on the emergence of the social institutions, patterns, and conflicts that still characterize the United States during the early twenty-first century. Lectures, readings, and discussions will also explore race slavery in the South, abolitionism, the social and economic struggles of free African Americans in the North, the gender ideology of domesticity, the changing social and economic status of women, and the emergence of the women’s rights movement. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

HSTY 218. Jews in Early Modern Europe. 3 Units.

. This course surveys the history of Jews in Europe and the wider world from the Spanish expulsion through the French Revolution. Tracking peregrinations out of the Iberian Peninsula to the British Isles, France, Holland, Italy, Germany, Poland-Lithuania, the Ottoman Empire, and the American colonies, it examines the diverse ways Jews organized their communities, interacted with their non-Jewish neighbors, and negotiated their social, economic, and legal status within different states and empires.  Through a selection of inquisitorial transcripts, government records, memoirs, and historical literature, we will explore topics such as persecution, conversion, messianism, toleration, emancipation, and assimilation. Offered as HSTY 218JDST 218, and ETHS 218. Counts as SAGES Departmental Seminar. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 240. Shopping for Change: Consumer Culture and Social Movements in America 3 Units.

Consumption has been central to American political, economic, and social life. Americans have engaged in individual and collective action as consumers to fight corporate malfeasance, to influence legislators, and to assert consumers’ rights. Yet being a consumer is also a political practice, and forms of consumer activism have been central to some of the most important struggles for social justice, political rights, and freedom in America. By reading primary and secondary sources, we will examine how consumption was a means to challenge gender, race, and class barriers, to claim equality and citizenship, and to fight social injustice. However, in looking at these struggles over access, control, and rights, we will also examine how the focus on consumption was used to co-opt subversive political messages and to contain radicalism.

HSTY 250. Issues and Methods in History. 3 Units.

A methodological introduction to historical research. Students use a variety of approaches to interpret and study historical problems. Specific topics and instructors normally vary from year to year.

HSTY 260. U.S. Slavery and Emancipation. 3 Units.

Begins with the African encounter with Europeans during the emergence of the modern slave trade. Students are introduced to the documents and secondary literature on the creation and maintenance of slavery, first in colonial America, and then in the United States. The course concludes with the destruction of slavery. Offered as AFST 260ETHS 260 and HSTY 260. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

HSTY 280. History of Modern Mexico. 3 Units.

This course explores the major issues that have influenced the formation of modern Mexico. This class is organized around three major themes. First, we will examine Mexican identity formation and its political implications. Second, we will assess Mexican life in relation to the development of the Mexican economy. Finally, we will survey how elite and popular forms of violence have affected Mexican society. Throughout the course, we will discuss the significance of the colonial heritage, regional distinctions, racial and gender stratification, and the creation and reconfiguration of various types of borders. Offered as HSTY 280 and ETHS 280. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

HSTY 318. History of Black Women in the U.S. 3 Units.

Chronologically arranged around specific issues in black women’s history organizations, participation in community and political movements, labor experiences, and expressive culture. The course will use a variety of materials, including autobiography, literature, music, and film. Offered as AFST 318ETHS 318HSTY 318, and WGST 318.

HSTY 363. Gender and Sexuality in America. 3 Units.

This multicultural seminar uses a mixture of historical text, gender theory, personal biography, and artistic expression to explore changing notions of gender and sexuality over the past two centuries in the United States. Offered as HSTY 363HSTY 463 and WGST 363. Counts for CAS Global & Cultural Diversity Requirement.

 

HSTY 395. History of Medicine. 3 Units.

This course treats selected topics in the history of medicine, with an emphasis on social and cultural history. Focusing on the modern period, we examine illnesses, patients, and healers, with attention to the ways sickness and medicine touch larger questions of politics, social relations and identity. Offered as HSTY 395 and HSTY 495.

HSTY 470. Historiography. 3 Units.

A graduate level survey of fundamental themes in historiography, method, and theory, as well as interdisciplinary methods and theories. Prereq: Graduate standing or instructor permission.

HSTY 476. Seminar in Comparative History. 3 Units.

An introduction to comparative method for historians. The topics will vary year to year, but the course will require exposure to historical contexts outside of the United States. Prereq: Graduate standing or instructor permission.

HSTY 495. History of Medicine. 3 Units.

This course treats selected topics in the history of medicine, with an emphasis on social and cultural history. Focusing on the modern period, we examine illnesses, patients, and healers, with attention to the ways sickness and medicine touch larger questions of politics, social relations and identity. Offered as HSTY 395 and HSTY 495. Prereq: Graduate standing or instructor permission.